Fraudes y Estafas

Anyone can fall victim to fraud and identity theft, but seniors are often inundated with investment offers, promises of instant wealth and requests for charitable contributions. Seniors are less likely to report fraud for many reasons: they don’t know how to report the scam, are ashamed of being scammed, or don’t know that they have been scammed. Also, seniors may not report the crime because they’re concerned that relatives may think they no longer have the capacity to manage their own finances. Unfortunately, lack of reporting contributes to keeping seniors at risk for fraud and identity theft. The alerts below will provide you with additional information on how to protect yourself from scams:

A fraud alert can be placed on your credit report if you suspect you are or may become a victim of identity theft. The credit bureau that you contact must coordinate with the other two credit bureaus to ensure they place the fraud alert on your credit report as well. This alert advises lenders to take extra precautions before extending credit in your name. The alert will remain on your report for one year, but can be removed sooner at your request. There is no fee to place a fraud alert on your credit report. Placing a fraud alert also allows you to order one free copy of your credit report from each of the three credit reporting bureaus. For more information, visit www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0275-place-fraud-alert.

An extended fraud alert placed on your credit report means that you have been a victim of identity theft and filed an Identity Theft Report with one of the three credit bureaus. The credit bureau that you contact must coordinate with the other two credit bureaus to ensure they place the extended fraud alert on your credit report as well. Lenders must verify your identity prior to issuing new credit in your name. As an added precaution, after placing the extended fraud alert on your credit report, creditors must remove your name from lists of pre-approved credit offers for five years. This alert will last for seven years, but can be removed sooner. By placing an extended fraud alert on your file, you are able to order two free credit reports within 12 months from each of the three credit reporting bureaus. For more information, visit www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0279-extended-fraud-alerts-and-credit-freezes.

Requesting a security freeze on your credit report prevents third parties from receiving a copy of your credit report without your approval. The Fair Credit Reporting Act allows you to place a security freeze on your credit report free of charge. You must request the security freeze with each of the three credit bureaus online, by phone or by mail. You will not be able to open new lines of credit if a security freeze is in place. A security freeze can be temporarily lifted for a period of time or removed. To request a temporary lift or to remove a security freeze, you will have to contact each of the three credit bureaus. If you request a temporary lift of your security freeze online or by phone, the credit bureau must lift the freeze within one hour of your request. By mail it may take up to three business days after receiving your request. This is the most secure way to protect your credit. NOTE: After receiving your freeze request, each credit bureau will provide a unique personal identification number (PIN) or password that you will need to lift the freeze by phone or mail. Store this in a safe place. For more information, visit www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0497-credit-freeze-faqs.

A continuación proporcionamos la información de contacto de cada una de las tres agencias de informes de crédito para activar una alerta de fraude en su informe de crédito.


Equifax

www.equifax.com/personal/credit-report-services/

P.O. Box 105069, Atlanta, GA 30348-5069

1-800-685-1111


Experian

www.experian.com/help/

P.O. Box 9554, Allen, TX 75013

1-888-397-3742


TransUnion


www.transunion.com/credit-help

P.O. Box 2000, Chester, PA 19016

1-800-680-7289



Below is the contact information to place a security freeze on your credit report:


Equifax


www.equifax.com/personal/credit-report-services/

P.O. Box 105788, Atlanta, GA 30348-5788

1-800-685-1111


Experian


www.experian.com/help/

P.O. Box 9554, Allen, TX 75013

1-888-397-3742


TransUnion


www.transunion.com/credit-help

P.O. Box 160, Woodlyn, PA 19094

1-888-909-8872

Estafas a Consumidores

Scammers are always finding new ways to take advantage of consumers by stealing their financial information but seniors are especially at risk for financial exploitation. It is estimated that seniors lose $2.9 billion each year to financial frauds and scams. Studies suggest that financial fraud against seniors goes widely unreported, often out of embarrassment or fear that they will lose independence if their loved ones find out they’ve been deceived. No one wants to feel incapable of handling their personal finances. Scammers dupe seniors into believing scams such as: their grandchild has been arrested and money must be wired immediately so that they can be released from jail or following a disaster or devastating event, scammers will prey on the trusting nature of seniors to seek a false contribution.

La mejor manera de protegerse de las estafas y el fraude es estar informado. Conozca los métodos que usan los estafadores para aprovecharse de los consumidores y así poder detectar una estafa antes de convertirse en víctima. A continuación detallamos algunas de las principales estafas a consumidores que afectan a las personas mayores para ayudarle a mantenerse en alerta.

Las 3 Principales Estafas a Personas Mayores de entre 55 y 64 Años de Edad

  1. Estafas Románticas
  2. Estafas de Inversión
  3. Estafas de Mejoras en el Hogar

Las 3 Principales Estafas a Personas Mayores de 65 

  1. Travel/Vacation/Timeshare Scams
  2. Estafas de Mejoras en el Hogar
  3. Estafas Románticas